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Desert Castles Tour

Desert castles Day Tour :

Desert castles option one :

From Amman Airport or your Hotel in Amman  to Desert Castles

The Tour start from Amman Airport or your hotel in Amman To Qasr Al Kharaneh then to Qasr Amra, from Qasr Amra to Azraq Castle and Azraq Wetland Reserve  then back to Amman

Desert castles option two :

From Madaba to Desert Castles

The  day Tour  start from Madaba To Qasr Al Kharaneh then to Qasr Amra, from Qasr Amra to Azraq Castle andAzraq Wetland Reserve  then back to Madaba

Desert castles option three:

From Dead Sea to Desert Castles

The  Tour start from Dead SeaTo Qasr Al Kharaneh then to Qasr Amra, from Qasr Amra to Azraq Castle andAzraq Wetland Reserve  then back to Dead Sea

 Qasr al-Kharaneh

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The latter part of the reign of AbdulMalek bin Marwan (685-750) seems to have been an exceptionally favorable interlude for the Umayyads. Being more firmly on the saddle, one can detect a sudden release of talent and creativity, which was manifested by the construction of the first major Islamic monument in Jerusalem, the majestic Dome of the Rock. The architectural program initiated by Caliph AbdulMalek bin Marwan, was continued and expanded by his son, Al-Walid bin AbdulMalek, who built the great mosques of Damascus, Jerusalem, and Medina.

Throughout the following decades, the Umayyads dotted the Jordanian steppe with luxurious buildings decorated with splendid mosaic pavements, fresco paintings, and carved stucco. All these indicate that the Umayyads had found a modus vivendi with the Syrian civilization. The fact that several of these buildings were located in the Jordanian steppe points to the overriding importance of the area. Indeed, the area's incorporation into the military district (Jund) of Damascus, whose governor was directly responsible to Damascus, attests to its vitality.

Quseir Amra

Qasr Amra , often Quseir Amra or Qusayr Amra, is the best-known of the desert castles located in present-day eastern Jordan. It was built early in the 8th century, sometime between 723 and 743, by Walid Ibn Yazid, the future Umayyad caliph Walid II, whose dominance of the region was rising at the time. It is considered one of the most important examples of early Islamic art and architecture. The discovery of an inscription during work in 2012 has allowed for more accurate dating of the structure.

The building is actually the remnant of a larger complex that included an actual castle, of which only the foundation remains. What stands today is a small country cabin, meant as a royal retreat, without any military function. It is most notable for the frescoes that remain on the ceilings inside, which depict hunting, naked women and, above one bath chamber, an accurate representation of the zodiac. These have led to its designation as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, one of four in the country, and its location along Jordan's major east-west highway, relatively close to Amman, have made it a frequent tourist destination.

Azraq Castle

   Azraq is located about 110 kilometers east of Amman at the junction of roads leading northeast into Iraq and southeast into Saudi Arabia. With 12 square kilometers of lush parklands, pools and gardens, Azraq has the only water in all of the eastern desert. The oasis is also home to a host of water buffalo and other wildlife. There are four main springs which supply Azraq with its water as well as its name, which in Arabic means "blue." Over the past 15 years or so, the water level in Azraq’s 

swamps has fallen dramatically due to large-scale pumping to supply Amman and Irbid. This has resulted in the destruction of a large part of the marshlands. While Azraq remains one of the most important oases in the Middle East for birds migrating between Africa and Europe, its declining water levels have led many species to bypass Azraq in favor of other stops. The area was once home to numerous deer, bear, ibex, oryx, cheetah and gazelle, many of which have been decimated in the last sixty years by overzealous hunters

Azraq Wetland Reserve

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For several millennia, the Qa’al Azraq (Azraq Basin) comprised a huge area of mudflats, pools and marshlands, which led to the establishment of Azraq as one of the most important oasis towns in the Levant. Since the mass pumping of water to thirsty Amman, however, the wetlands have almost disappeared. Thankfully, the Royal Society for the Conservation of Nature (RSCN) has worked to preserve and restore the remainder, and they remain a fascinating place to visit.

Although just 10% of the original wetlands remains, about 300 species of resident and migratory birds use the wetlands during their winter migration from Europe to Africa, including raptors, larks, warblers, finches, harriers, eagles, plovers and ducks. A few buffaloes also wallow in the marshy environs, and jackals and gerbils are occasionally spotted in the late evening. The best time to see birdlife is in winter (December to February) and early spring (March and April). Large flocks of raptors steadily arrive in May. Ultimately, however, bird populations are dependent on the water levels in the reserve, and as the water continues to be pumped out quicker than it is pumped in, the future of the oasis remains in jeopardy.