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Northen Side Tour

Northen Side One Day Tour Options :

The Tour start from Amman Airport or your hotel in Amman To Jerash then to Ajloun, from Ajloun to Um Qais then back to Amman

From Amman Airport to Jerash, Ajloun & Um Qais

Northen Side Tour option One:

The Tour start from Madaba To Jerash then to Ajloun, from Ajloun to Um Qais then back to Madaba

From Madaba to Jerash, Ajloun & Um Qais

Northen Side Tour option Two:

The Tour start from Dead Sea  To Jerash then to Ajloun, from Ajloun to Um Qais then back to Dead Sea

From Dead Sea to Jerash, Ajloun & Um Qais

Northen Side Tour option Three:

Jerash Tour

Jerash tour is the capital and the largest city of Jerash GovernorateJordan, with a population of 50,745 as of 2015. It is located 48 kilometres (30 mi) north of the capital of Jordan, Amman.

The history of the city tour is a blend of the Greco-Roman world of the Mediterranean Basin and the ancient traditions of the Arab Orient.

The city flourished until the mid-eighth century CE, when the 749 Galilee earthquake destroyed large parts of it, while subsequent earthquakes (847 Damascus earthquake) contributed to additional destruction

However, In the early 12th century, by the year 1120, Zahir ad-Din Toghtekin, atabeg of Damascus ordered a garrison of forty men stationed in Jerash to convert the Temple of Artemis into a fortress. It was captured in 1121 by Baldwin II, King of Jerusalem, and utterly destroyed.

Jerash tour was then deserted until it reappeared by the beginning of the Ottoman rule in the early 16th century.

In the census of 1596, it had a population of 12 Muslim households.[8] However, the archaeologists have found a small Mamluk hamlet in the Northwest Quarter[9] which indicates that Jerash was resettled before the Ottoman era. The excavations conducted since 2011 have shed light on the Middle Islamic period as recent discoveries have uncovered a large concentration of Middle Islamic/Mamluk structures and pottery.[10]

In the census of 1596, it had a population of 12 Muslim households.[8] However, the archaeologists have found a small Mamluk hamlet in the Northwest Quarter[9] which indicates that Jerash was resettled before the Ottoman era. The excavations conducted since 2011 have shed light on the Middle Islamic period as recent discoveries have uncovered a large concentration of Middle Islamic/Mamluk structures and pottery.[10]

Ajloun

Ajloun is the capital town of the Ajloun Governorate, a hilly town in the north of Jordan, located 76 kilometers north west of Amman. It is noted for its impressive ruins of the 12th-century Ajlun Castle.

The Ajlun Governorate has a population of over 176080 widespread in 27 villages and towns over an area of about 420 km². 

Ajloun Castle also known as  is a 12th-century Muslim castle situated in northwestern Jordan. It is placed on a hilltop belonging to the Jabal Ajlun ("Mount Ajlun") district, also known as Jabal 'Auf after a Bedouin tribe which had captured the area in the 12th century. From its high ground the castle was guarding three wadis which descend towards the Jordan Valley. It was built by the Ayyubids in the 12th century and enlarged by the Mamluks in the 13th.

The name 'Ajlun goes back to a Christian monk who lived on this mountain in the Byzantine Period.[1] The castle stands on the ruins of a monastery, traces of which were discovered during archaeological excavations.

The castle has been the nucleus of a settlement which has grown to become the present town of Ajloun. The castle's developing faubourg led to its second name, Qal'at ar-rabad , this name still resonates in the surname of a large and reputable Christian family owning most of the agricultural lands in the direct vicinity of the castle until this day, the Al-Rabadis.

Ajlun Castle is located on the site of an old monastery.

 It was renovated as a fort in 1184 by Izz al-Din Usama, a general in the army of Saladin.

The castle controlled traffic along the road connecting Damascus and Egypt.

Umm Qais Tour

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Gadara was renowned in its time as a cultural centre. It was the home of several classical poets and philosophers, including Theodorus, founder of a rhetorical school in Rome, and was once called “a new Athens” by a poet.Perched on a splendid hilltop overlooking the Jordan Valley and the Sea of Galilee Gadara is known today as Umm Qays, and boasts an impressive colonnaded street, a vaulted terrace, and the ruins of two theatres.You can take in the sights and then dine on the terrace of a fine restaurant with a breathtaking view.Gadara was situated in a defensible position on a ridge accessible to the east but protected by steep falls on the other three sides. It was well-watered, with access to the Ain Qais spring and cisterns.

Gadara was a center of Greek culture in the region, enjoying special political and religious status. By the third century BC the town was of some cultural importance.

 the Greek historian Polybius describes Gadara as being in 218 BC the "strongest of all places in the region". Nevertheless, it capitulated shortly afterwards when besieged by the Seleucid king Antiochus III of Syria. The region passed in and out of the control of the Seleucid kings of Syria and the Ptolemies of Egypt.

Gadara was captured and damaged by Alexander Jannaeus.

In the early first century BC Gadara gave birth to its most famous son, Meleager. He was one of the most admired Hellenistic Greek poets, not only for his own works but also for his anthology of other poets, which formed the basis of the large collection known as the Greek Anthology.

 In 63 BC, when the Roman general Pompey placed the region under Roman control, he rebuilt Gadara and made it one of the semi-autonomous cities of the Roman Decapolis and a bulwark against Nabataean expansion.